“I like Ike”

Ike’s parent’s house while growing up in Abilene, Kansas.

On my recent driving trip out west, I stopped in Abilene, Kansas for the night. As this was the childhood home of President Eisenhower, I decided to visit the Dwight D. Eisenhower Museum and Library. I was pleasantly surprised when I found out they had just opened a WWI exhibit in the Eisenhower Library the day before.

Dwight D. Eisenhower (Ike) was president from 1953 to 1961 during my infant and toddler years. By most accounts, he was a darn good president. He balanced the budget, ended the Korean War, and kept the peace. Not bad for a lifelong military man. Previously, he served as the supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces in Europe during WWII which is a whole other story.

Dwight and Mamie 1916.

During WWI, Ike had been a captain in the U.S. Army. He requested on a couple different occasions to be sent to France, but he was thwarted in his efforts. Instead, he served stateside in a variety of different roles including training tank crews in Pennsylvania.

What I found interesting about the WWI exhibit was the information about the roles of previous Presidents in WWI. President Truman (who preceded Ike) was a Captain and served in France. FDR (who preceded Truman) served as Assistant Secretary to the Navy during WWI. Herbert Hoover (who preceded FDR) headed the U.S. Food Administration during WWI and led the efforts in humanitarian aide to Belgium.

The chapel at the Eisenhower Center.

I also visited the chapel where Dwight and Mamie and their four year old son, Doud, who died of scarlet fever are buried.  I toured the inside of his boyhood home. It was left pretty much the way it was when Ike’s mother died in 1946. It was a pretty quiet visit, but I’m glad I stopped.

 

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